Technology Changing Policing for the Better

Technology Changing Policing for the Better

TechnologyI am a huge fan of technology and how it can improve policing in America. Police departments are often slow to react and adopt new technologies. A new interactive film called RIOT, is about to do just that. UK filmmaker, Karen Palmer, has developed an interactive software designed to read people’s emotions. This could improve how police act towards a group and may even prevent an overreaction. This new technology may even provide a chance to predict someone’s behavior. Wouldn’t that be interesting?

How it Works

RIOT is interactive artificial intelligence software that uses algorithms to read the faces of people in the crowd. It combines artificial intelligence with neurogaming that registers people’s reactions. Those reactions, calm, anger, and fear elicit a response in real-time. That response will come from the police officer. This is a proactive step in avoiding a police action that can set a crowd off into a riot.

How can it Help the Police?

More information is always better than no information. It provides an opportunity to the police to identify potential bad actors at an otherwise peaceful demonstration. Many times a riot is kicked off by a police action or a rumor of a police action. No software can ever determine this. However, we are on to something that may work. I do see some issues wrinkles and challenges if put into use. The software reads emotions, but not a person’s intent. A person’s intent is the cornerstone for criminal activity and arrest. I can also see challenges from Right to Privacy advocates, but that will be a non-issue. A person has no reasonable expectation of privacy in public.

I had a chance to be part of the CBS New York segment on the new AI experiment.

For more on the film and the project, visit RIOT

 

By | 2017-06-18T12:29:19+00:00 June 19th, 2017|Technology, TV News|

About the Author:

Joe Giacalone is a retired NYPD Sergeant, current Adjunct Professor, media contributor and internationally recognized policing expert. Joe has been on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, Fox Business News, CBS, NBC, ABC, The Today Show, Good Morning America and many more.